Animalia

An Anthrozoology Journal

Animal-Assisted Interventions as a Learning Aid – A Literature Review

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Animal-assisted interventions (AAI) on learning and mental health is an evolving matter within psychology. In past history, such mediations have been held to ridicule by scholars who deemed animals to be insignificant within the field. Today, the American Humane Association postulates that the objective of AAI is a goal-directed movement, used to improve one’s “social, cognitive or emotional functioning” (Ganzert, 2013). “Animal- assisted Intervention” is an umbrella term for what is traditionally known as animal-assisted therapy (AAT), animal-assisted activities (AAA), and animal-assisted education (AAE). This paper seeks to provide a comprehensive review of extant empirical research on AAI as a tool to enhance children’s learning outcomes.

By Robyn Lawes

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4 thoughts on “Animal-Assisted Interventions as a Learning Aid – A Literature Review

  1. I really enjoyed this article – I know from personal experience how much our pets can contribute to mental well-being – and I love the idea of the school dog! The potential benefits of assimilating animals into our daily lives are clearly enormous. A fascinating topic.

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  2. Well done very good read 👍🏻 As a canine behaviourist the relationship between dog and human is one of the most fascinating and beautiful things I get to witness…great article

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  3. This paper fails to cite or discuss the considerable short-comings of much of the research on AAI. See articles by Hal Herzog and Lori Marino.

    Kenneth Shapiro, PhD President of the Board Animals and Society Institute Editor, Society and Animals Co-Editor, Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science 403 McCauley St., Washington Grove MD 20880 301 963 4751 http://www.animalsandsociety.org

    The Identification, Assessment, and Treatment of Adults who Abuse Animals: The AniCare Approach, Springer, 2016. Co-author Antonia Henderson

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