Pet Scanning How It Works?

How does a PET scanner work?

PET works by using a scanning device (a machine with a large hole at its center) to detect photons (subatomic particles) emitted by a radionuclide in the organ or tissue being examined. Gamma rays are created during the emission of positrons, and the scanner then detects the gamma rays.

What is a PET scan and how long does it take?

How long does a PET scan take? After the radiotracer is injected into a vein, it usually takes up to one hour to travel throughout the body and be absorbed into the organs or tissues that are being examined. The PET scan itself may take another 30 to 60 minutes. Heart and brain studies take less time for imaging.

How does a PET scan work to detect cancer?

PET stands for positron emission tomography. The PET scan uses a mildly radioactive drug to show up areas of your body where cells are more active than normal. It’s used to help diagnose some conditions including cancer. It can also help to find out where and whether cancer has spread.

What are PET scans used for?

PET scans of the brain for Alzheimer’s disease

A positron emission tomography (PET) scan is an imaging test that helps reveal how your tissues and organs are functioning. A PET scan uses a radioactive drug (tracer) to show this activity. This scan can sometimes detect disease before it shows up on other imaging tests.